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The 28th Annual CALI Conference for Law School Computing
June 7 & 8, 2018
American University Washington College of Law
Washington DC


Wednesday June 6, 2018 pre-conference activities
  • Sponsor setup at American University Washington College of Law. 1pm – 7pm
  • Conference check-in at American University Washington College of Law. 3pm – 7pm
  • Speaker Meeting (optional) at American in room NT08. 6pm - 6:30pm

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Thursday, June 7
 

8:00am

Breakfast 1
Thursday breakfast

Thursday June 7, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Grossman Hall

9:00am

Keynote: How Do Lawyers Get Paid If Access to Justice is Free?
The rise of the self-represented litigant has disrupted the civil justice system. Courts no longer rely on lawyers to manage the litigants, but the due process remains so courts have had to step-up and create user-friendly systems for lay people. By providing comprehensive, 24/7 self-help services such as forms, instructions, tailored procedural guidance, and triaged case flow management; courts can create transparent and navigable systems. However, the bespoke approach contemplated in an adversarial process is lost without lawyers. Lawyers are still very much needed, however, their new role is only beginning to be understood. It is one that has paradoxically narrowed in focus yet, because of technology, expanded in delivery opportunities. Legal education has an opportunity to equip new lawyers with the legal and practical skills to be successful in today's legal market that demands 24/7 services accessible by cellphone from anywhere in the world while engaging more autonomous clients who seek refined and targeted legal advice, strategy and big-picture analysis. This talk will explore the many opportunities that are presenting in this re-aligning market, and consider the negative and positive impacts, particularly with respect to technology, on access to justice.

Watch the keynote live: https://youtu.be/IrPzxQ04OvI

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Alteneder

Katherine Alteneder

Executive Director, Self-Represented Litigation Network
Since 2013, Katherine Alteneder has been the Executive Director of the Self-Represented Litigation Network (SRLN) the only non-profit supporting justice system professionals focused on the question of how best to reform ALL aspects of the legal system (courts, legal aid, the bar and... Read More →


Thursday June 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:30am
Grossman Hall

10:30am

Break 1
Thursday June 7, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
American University Washington College of Law 4300 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA

11:00am

Notes & Comments: Unique Resources for the Law School Institutional Repository
Institutional repositories provide law schools the opportunity to make unique resources available to their patrons and to the public. The University of North Carolina School of Law's Kathrine R. Everett Law Library is in the process of adding a digitized backfile of notes and comments from the school's flagship law journal, the North Carolina Law Review, that were otherwise quite difficult to access online. More than 1,700 individual notes or editorial comments were described and are in the process of being posted to the Carolina Law Scholarship Repository law journals collection. Many of the notes chart the development of substantive legal doctrine in this state and offer insights to practitioners as well as to academic researchers. Some notes, especially early ones, are authored by prominent professors and jurists. Other notes are authored by students who would become leaders in the state's legal community.
In this session, after learning whether your school has similiar unique and useful resources sitting just below the surface, you will get a sense of the specific workflows the repository manager at UNC developed (warts and all). You will also learn a bit about how the project was organized and how institutional stakeholders, including the editors of the law review, were consulted. Specific technology used included Acrobat Pro and Excel, as well as very simplistic Python scripts for cleaning data from Hein's CSV files. This session is ideal for any librarian who works with or manages an IR -- specifically a BePress Digital Commons instance -- or for librarians in a public-facing role who may wish to advocate for similar collections at their institutions. Be prepared to leave the presentation ready to take on a new project that has distinct starting and ending points and that can be accomplished without undue effort.  
Presenter: Aaron Kirschenfeld, Digital Initiatives Law Librarian and Clinical Assistant Professor of Law, Kathrine R. Everett Law Library, University of North Carolina School of Law

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Kirschenfeld

Aaron Kirschenfeld

Digital Initiatives Law Librarian, Clinical Assistant Professor of Law, Kathrine R. Everett Law Library, UNC School of Law



Thursday June 7, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Y115

11:00am

The Problem of Engaging Students at a Distance
Now that everyone is sitting at their computers in the wee hours, bathed in the warm glow of their screens, how do you get to really engage with the instructor, the material or other members of the class?
Discussion boards can look like ghost towns, responses can be copy/paste, monosyllabic or forced.
Three presenters will talk about motivating students to engage in a distance learning course or situation.

Speakers
avatar for Jack Graves

Jack Graves

Professor and Director of Digital Legal Education, Touro Law Center
avatar for Glenn Greenberg

Glenn Greenberg

ggLearningworks LLC & The Washington College of Law
Glenn Greenberg focuses on the convergence of learning and education technology to help organizations reach their full range and capability of their learning offerings. He enables education professionals to e-magine new learning models delivered through multiple channels and provides... Read More →
avatar for John Mayer

John Mayer

Executive Director, CALI
Executive Director of CALI - law school consortium. Developers of A2J Author and hosts of A2J.org. Not a lawyer, 30 years working in tech, legal education and access to justice.
MM

Minara Mordecai

Univ Hawaii


Thursday June 7, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Y116

11:00am

Syncing CRM at Colorado Law
Like most Law Schools, Colorado Law has a number of systems in use to manage specific points in the student lifecycle.  These systems are disparate:  third-party, main campus, or Law School-specific.  What we lacked was an aggregator of these systems to allow us to work with data across systems and share changes efficiently.  Administrators and staff were stuck in a morass of spreadsheets and inefficient processes to gather and transfer data.  Process owners were spending more time trying to access their data instead of interacting with their specific processes (prospect, student, or alumni-driven).
This session will consider Colorado Law's ongoing journey to data nirvana.  We will discuss how we designed and developed our processes, what worked well, and what we would recommend for others undertaking a similar project within a Law School environment.  We will look at resources, constraints, and an overall project plan that would be applicable for other institutions attempting a similar endeavor.
Topics:  CRM, Project Management, Integrations, API, Database Development, Deployment, Release Management, User Adoption


Speakers
MB

Mike Burr

University of Colorado School of Law
avatar for Jonathan Sibray

Jonathan Sibray

IT Director, University of Colorado Law School
Jonathan Sibray is a Senior Director for IT at the University of Colorado Law School. He earned his BBA in MIS in 2002 and his MBA in Information Assurance in 2011. Jon’s career has focused on information technology in higher education since 1998. His accomplishments include: implementing... Read More →


Thursday June 7, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Weinstein Courtroom C116

11:00am

Using Drupal for a Better Orientation Experience
For several years, Loyola Law School Los Angeles utilized a home-grown "Orientation Task Scheduler" to help incoming students complete necessary tasks prior to arriving on campus for Orientation Week.   In 2015, the scheduler morphed into an "admissions portal", harnessing both the older Orientation Task Scheduler and utilizing Drupal to make an incoming student's experience even easier.     The portal has been tailored to work with various systems, such as Banner, to provide a customized experience to students in various programs (JD, MLS, LLM).
This presentation will cover two perspectives - 1) the development/planning/deploying phase, presented by Gabe Estrada, Senior Web Developer at Loyola Law School Los Angeles, and 2) the end user experience, presented by Corinne St. Claire.  

Speakers
avatar for Corinne St. Claire

Corinne St. Claire

Director of Law School Technology Services, Loyola Law School Los Angeles
Corinne St. Claire joined Loyola Law School Los Angeles in 2011 as Assistant Director of Instructional Design & Technology. In 2016, she transitioned to Director of Law School Technology Services. With close to 13 years of experience in higher education, she has facilitated and managed... Read More →
avatar for Gabe Estrada

Gabe Estrada

Senior Web Developer, Loyola Law School
Gabe Estrada joined the IT Department at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles in 2012 as web developer. Since joining the team seven years ago, Gabe has played a critical role in several projects which include the migration of the Law School’s legacy websites to Drupal and TerminalFour... Read More →


Thursday June 7, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Y403

12:00pm

Lunch 1
Lunch 6/7/18

Thursday June 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Grossman Hall

12:15pm

Procertas users meeting
Thursday June 7, 2018 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Y115

12:30pm

Library Tour
Thursday June 7, 2018 12:30pm - 1:15pm
Law Library 2nd Floor

12:30pm

Tech Tour
The tech will start at the Technology office, NT10 (Terrace level of the Warren building), then visit a large classroom, seminar room, the library active learning lab, and our court room, with one or two other rooms depending on time.

Speakers
RC

Russell Confroy

American University Washington College of Law
BR

Bryan Rapp

Director of Technology, American University Washington College of Law


Thursday June 7, 2018 12:30pm - 1:15pm
NT10

1:30pm

Sparking Innovation in the Classroom: How to Introduce Faculty to Instructional Technology
Before the 2017-2018 school year, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law held TEaCH LAW, a day-long conference and fair for faculty to share positive experiences about incorporating technology in the classroom. TEaCH LAW has grown and is now an ongoing series of demonstrations and extensive website resource for faculty to learn about new instructional technology tools from their peers. This CALIcon session will discuss the key elements to beginning a successful and ongoing initiative that encourages law faculty to explore the benefits of different instructional technology tools, from involving key stakeholders across the law school, ensuring variety of platforms, engaging presentations, and peer involvement. You do not need any previous knowledge about instructional technology to attend. Faculty, staff, and administrators are all welcome.    

Speakers
AC

Alyson Carrel

Clinical Assistant Professor, Assistant Dean of Law & Technology Initiatives, Northwestern University
avatar for Clare Willis

Clare Willis

Research & Instructional Services Librarian, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
Clare Gaynor Willis is the Research & Instructional Services Librarian at the Pritzker Legal Research Center, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law.


Thursday June 7, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Y116

1:30pm

Death-proofing Web Citations with Perma.cc
As the citation of web pages in journal articles, court briefs and decisions continues to grow, the permance of the cited item becomes increasingly important. However recent research has shown that 50% of the links in Supreme Court decisions from 1996-2010 had reference rot,  one in five articles suffers from reference rot, and  three out of four URI references lead to changed content. This link-rot and content drift is alarming for its potential to undermine the integrity of both the scholarly record and the law itself.
Enter  Perma.cc: when a user creates a Perma.cc link, Perma.cc archives the referenced content and generates a link to an archived record of the page. Regardless of what may happen to the original source, the archived record will always be available through the Perma.cc link. Over 500,000 links have been preserved through the Perma.cc service from users at over 200 courts and academic institutions.
This session will discuss what makes Perma.cc different, and at times more effective, for citations than other archiving services, recent developments, its use in the legal  (and legal ed)  arena, and prompt discussion and solicit feedback about how best to educate regarding link-rot, expand use in other academic institutions, and how Perma.cc's new commercial option can best benefit firms and other commercial entities. (Speaker may be joined by managing director of the Library Innovation Lab, Adam Zeigler.)

Speakers
avatar for Brett Johnson

Brett Johnson

Outreach/Support Lead, Library Innovation Lab, Harvard Law School
OER + Open casebooksweb archiving + citation preservationcomedy


Thursday June 7, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Y115

1:30pm

Scrape it off: Using or making web scraping tools to gather structured data from webpages
Often, in the course of research, librarians and faculty need to gather data that is presented on websites in tables or lists.   Although copy and paste can do the trick when the amount of data is small, at some point we need tools that can automate the job for us.   This is especially useful when gathering metadata for catalogs or online repositories, when much of the required metadata is already available through other sources, but needs to be collected and edited.
First, I will discuss the primary ways in which we can collect data via the internet
Then, I will focus on the use of pre-made web scraping utilities, covering what they are, how they work, and comparing some of the available free or low-cost options.
Finally, I will talk generally about how you could create your own web scraper, customized for what you need.   As an example, I will go through the development of a program I created to pull a monthly report of case opinion metadata from a court website using Python, and I will discuss the skills and tools you would need to go about developing a similar program.
Although I will be talking about programming a bit in this session, I will not be focusing on the specifics of coding.   This will be a beginner-friendly introduction to how web scrapers work, and what you may need to know if you find yourself needing to use one.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Carlson

Ben Carlson

Emerging Technologies Librarian, Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law


Thursday June 7, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Weinstein Courtroom C116

1:30pm

A2J Author Hands On Training
Limited Capacity seats available

A2J Author is a CALI software tool that enables non-programmer legal aid attorneys, court staff, and law students to create pro se litigant friendly document assembly packages. It has been used more than 4 million times by pro se litigants to help complete their court papers. Come to a hands on training to learn how to create A2J Guided Interviews, using our new A2J Document Assembly Tool and mobile responsive A2J Viewer, and how this revolutionary technology can be integrated into your classrooms. This session will consist of two parts. The first hour will be an introduction to the software, a discussion of how it's been integrated into over a dozen law school courses, and a basic software training. The second hour will involve hands on mini projects where participants can practice the skills they learned and create their own document assembly project.

Attendes should bring a laptop to the training session. To sign-up for this workshop please login and add this to your CALIcon18 schedule.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Frank

Jessica Frank

A2J Author Project Manager, CALI
Jessica Frank is the A2J Author Project Manager for the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI). She oversees the development team for A2J Author and provides community outreach, technical support, and training resources to the automated document development community... Read More →


Thursday June 7, 2018 1:30pm - 4:00pm
N100C

2:30pm

Break 2
Break 2 6/7/18 2:30 - 3:00

Thursday June 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
American University Washington College of Law 4300 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA

3:00pm

Sources of American Law - An Introduction to Legal Research: Adopting an eLangdell Book as a Coursebook
Law librarians from UNT Dallas College of Law and Georgia State University College of Law will discuss their experience developing the first-year research curriculum and a similar class for an LLM in American law program using Beau Steenken and Tina Brooks' textbook, along with its generous creative commons license, Sources of American Law - An Introduction to Legal Research. The book is a CALI eLangdell Press publication now in its third edition. It is freely available in several downloadable formats for various platforms as well as an affordable print-and-bind-on-demand service. They will discuss factors that led to the book's adoption and their takeaways transitioning away from a more traditional legal research text. For example, one benefit is the ability to take advantage of the creative commons license to rewrite exercises for their jurisdiction. Also important is the interplay between the contents of the book and the promotion of related CALI Lessons. In addition to their feedback, presenters will share commentary from current and former students.
This program is for law librarians and professors who are interested in teaching using eLangdell publications and how these materials can be adapted to different teaching methods.  

Speakers
MB

Margaret Butler

Associate Director for Public Services, GSU College of Law Library
Meg loves working in the law library where she encourages her colleagues to provide the best service possible to the students who seek assistance. The library provides services including study room reservation, circulation and reference, interlibrary loan, and document delivery.
EH

Edward Hart

Assistant Dean for Law Libraries, UNT Dallas College of Law


Thursday June 7, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Y402

3:00pm

Lessons in Engagement from Game Designers
A few years ago, "gamification" was the Next Big Thing in everything, borrowing the incentive systems from games - scores, achievements, and levels - to engage students, customers, and employees. However, those incentive systems are not the only ways that games engage their players: Games rely on countless techniques to appeal to their players and engage them in play. Just like the obvious incentive systems that gamification taps into, we can use these methods to engage students, faculty, and administrators, and encourage them to take a more active role in their education, use of technology, and implementation of policy. This program will tap into some specific lessons game designers have learned from their experiences in how to engage with their players, and how to apply those lessons to legal education.
 

Speakers
JP

Joshua Pluta

Director of Research and Instructional Services, UMKC Law Library


Thursday June 7, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Y116

3:00pm

Word Styles and Document Automation: Making documents more efficient in the practice of law
Technology has changed the practice of law and, increasingly, is creating new job opportunities for enterprising lawyers. Many practitioners and law students, though, do not unlock the true power of Microsoft Word. Instead, we treat it as a text-based word processor. This talk will expose attorneys, law students and those teaching law students to working with Word styles and taking advantage of document automation, navigation and assembly.   Law students can use Word styles in their resumes to give their job searches flexibility. The North Carolina Supreme Court recently released new rules for styling briefs and other court documents.   Learn how using templates already built into Word can ease these types of transitions and help automate document output.
After this session you will:
  • Understand the importance of Styles
  • Understand the difference between Paragraph, Character and Linked Styles
  • Create, Modify and Locate your Own Styles
  • Understand Where Styles Are Stored
  • Understand how to use Styles with court rules and resumes
  • Understand how to automatically create a Table of Authorities
 

Speakers
avatar for Stacey Rowland

Stacey Rowland

Clinical Assistant Professor of Law, Assistant Director for Collection & Technology Services, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, Kathrine R. Everett Law Library
Stacey Rowland came to UNC as the Reference & Digital Communications Librarian in 2015. Her IT expertise, including systems, web design, and network trouble shooting led to the expansion of her role as the IT Services Librarian and then to her current position as the Assistant Director... Read More →


Thursday June 7, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Y400

3:00pm

Law Library Websites and Third Party Trackers: A Privacy Study
Librarians are known for protecting the privacy of their patrons, but  with the shift to online resources, third parties  regularly collect data on  library patrons' use of library materials, using this data to target patrons  for advertising  around the web.
This program will present original research about third party tracking  on law school library websites. We'll identify who is  surveilling patrons and how, discuss the practical and ethical effects  of this loss of patron anonymity, and present strategies (where possible)  for curbing third-party tracking of library  patrons.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Boone

Tom Boone

Library Technology Consultant, Tom Boone Consulting


Thursday June 7, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Y401

4:00pm

Break 3
Break 3 6/7/18 4:00 - 4:30

Thursday June 7, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
American University Washington College of Law 4300 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA

4:30pm

LII: Under the Hood
LII publishes original content and enhanced primary legal materials for an ever-growing audience that ranges from lawyers to middle school students.  With examples from recent projects, this session will address what we're publishing and maintaining, how we're choosing and undertaking new projects, and what challenges we face as we look ahead to the future. We think that these examples will be of use to anyone engaging in iterative development processes, innovating  while maintaining existing operations,  and seeking out new audiences for the work they are already doing.    
 

Speakers
SF

Sara Frug

Associate Director, Legal Information Institute, Cornell Law School


Thursday June 7, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Y403

4:30pm

Using Excel for a simulation exercise in a law office technology course
Simulations can run the gamut from paper based to full online environment. What if you want a "what-if" scenario, but don't see the need to invest in an interactive environment? Excel can serve as a great intermediary solution. In this session I will introduce the simulation my co-instructor and I have used in our Introduction to Law Office Technology seminar. I will discuss how it was made and describe our experiences, both good and bad. Audience members will "play along," and have an opportunity to discuss their own experiences with simulations. Bring a device that can run Excel to get the full experience. No experience is required, but some experience with Excel functions would be helpful. You will leave understanding how Excel's conditionals can be used to create gamelike scenarios.

Speakers
avatar for Wayne Miller

Wayne Miller

Associate Dean for Academic Technologies, Duke University School of Law
Wayne is the Assistant Dean for Academic Technologies at Duke Law. He has spent his adult life in academia, first as a PhD student in German and then as an IT support person of various stripes and colors at UC Berkeley and UCLA. In 2001 he moved with his family to North Carolina and... Read More →


Thursday June 7, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Y400

4:30pm

A Conversation About Technology Competency
In this session, John Mayer, Executive Director of CALI will lead a discussion about the rise in interest in “technology competency” requirements/recommendations as promulgated by new ABA Standards and State Bar Association rules. 

30 states have adopted some form of an “ethical duty to technology competency” (https://www.lawsitesblog.com/2018/03/make-30-states-another-adopts-ethical-duty-technology-competence.html)

How are law schools responding to this new mandate?

What options are available?

What can CALI do?

This session will be a discussion where audience members can share their local responses and talk about how they are implementing projects and products into their curricula.

Speakers
avatar for Elmer Masters

Elmer Masters

Director of Technology, CALI
Elmer R. Masters is the Director of Technology at the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (www.cali.org) where he works on interesting projects involving technology and legal education like eLangdell, Classcaster, Lawbooks, and the CALI website. He has over 20 years experience... Read More →
avatar for John Mayer

John Mayer

Executive Director, CALI
Executive Director of CALI - law school consortium. Developers of A2J Author and hosts of A2J.org. Not a lawyer, 30 years working in tech, legal education and access to justice.


Thursday June 7, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Y402

4:30pm

Battling Fake News and Developing Digital Literacy Skills within the Legal Profession
Alternative facts? Truthiness?   Post Truth?   Hardly a day passes without someone making a reference to fake news. But why should lawyers care and what can information technology professionals and the legal academy do about it?
In order to fulfil a lawyer's duty of technology competency, digital information literacy is essential. Legal professionals must be able to locate, evaluate and use online information effectively.  Evaluation of the reliability of digital information is a complex skill that must be mastered for the successful practice of law.
This program will discuss digital information literacy in the context of fake news.   The session will provide an overview of fake news including tracing the history of its origin.   We'll discuss why it matters and the consequences of failing to detect fake news. Tips and tools for evaluating the credibility of news sources will be provided as well as strategies for creating successful information literacy programming.  
 

Speakers
avatar for Kris Niedringhaus

Kris Niedringhaus

Assoc Dean for Library & Info Services, Georgia State University College of Law
Kris Niedringhaus is Associate Dean for Library and Information Services at Georgia State University College of Law. Kris has been a library director for 12+ years and supervised law school IT for 8 of those years. She speaks and writes about management issues, legal research and... Read More →
avatar for Caroline Osborne

Caroline Osborne

Assistant Dean of Legal Information Services, Washington and Lee University School of Law
avatar for Carol Watson

Carol Watson

Law Librarian, University of Georgia
Carol A. Watson has served as director of the UGA Law Library since 2010. She is responsible for the vision, leadership and management of all aspects of the law library including strategic planning, budgeting, collection development, technology and personnel. She has written extensively... Read More →


Thursday June 7, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Y401

6:30pm

Reception
Thursday June 7, 2018 6:30pm - 10:30pm
Grossman Hall
 
Friday, June 8
 

8:00am

Breakfast 2
Friday breakfast

Friday June 8, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Grossman Hall

9:00am

Is There Anything Law School Faculty Members Can Learn from Research on Evidence-Based STEM Instruction?
Since the 1990s, the National Science Foundation directed millions of dollars into research into how to increase participation rates and remove barriers to success in STEM education.   For scientists, it was always clear that, "No one would think of getting to the Moon or wiping out a disease without research.   Likewise, one cannot expect reform efforts in education to have significant effects without research-based knowledge to guide them. " (Shavelson and Towne, Scientific Research in Education, 2002) The model of €œevidence based STEM instruction € that has emerged from NSF-funded research is transforming science education in primary, secondary and higher education.   Can any of the results of decades into making scientific knowledge more accessible be applied in legal education?   This panel reviews some of the basic principles of evidence-based STEM instruction and considers how they might be applied to broaden participation and remove barriers to success in legal education.
 


Friday June 8, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
YT16

9:00am

Wikipedia in the Legal Research Classroom
No matter how many reliable research strategies they are taught, the new generation of law students (and attorneys) often use Wikipedia as a starting point for their legal research. Detailed Wikipedia pages for primary law are being edited every day; they can't be ignored even as we attempt to teach students advanced research skills. Instead, we can examine the information and sources of information on these Wikipedia pages. This session will breakdown the type of legal pages that currently appear on Wikipedia and the type of information available on these pages. The €œlegislative history € infobox on statutory Wikipedia pages will be evaluated for the scope of information available and the range of hyperlinked sources of information. The session will conclude with strategies for dealing with Wikipedia's presence in the legal research classroom. Participants will leave the session with a clear understanding of what students are seeing on legal Wikipedia pages and ideas for facing the unique challenge of Wikipedia as a research tool. Attendees don't need any prior knowledge before attending this session, just a desire to hear more about an online source that is disliked by educators everywhere!
Takeaways:
  • Participants will be able to understand how a new generation of law students interacts with Wikipedia.
  • Participants will be able to identify the different types of legal Wikipedia entries and the information covered by these entries.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Downing

Nicole Downing

Reference Librarian, UNC Law Library


Friday June 8, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Y116

9:00am

Get Smart: Are Smartphones in the Law School Classroom a Recipe for KAOS?
Should laptops and smartphones be allowed in the law school classroom? This session will provide a brief overview of the research on laptops and smartphones in the classroom. We'll discuss the pros and cons of their use and devote the bulk of the session to exploring ways to leverage laptop and smartphone use in the law school classroom.   We will conclude by brainstorming with attendees about additional uses. By the end of the session, attendees should be able to identify specific uses for laptops and smartphones, including apps and activities, that will enhance students' learning in the classroom.
 

Speakers
avatar for Khelani Clay

Khelani Clay

Law Librarian, American University Washington College of Law
avatar for Shannon Roddy

Shannon Roddy

Student Services Librarian, American University Washington College of Law


Friday June 8, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Y115

9:00am

The Malpractice of Hunches: Professional Responsibility, AI, and Data Analytics
Clients ask lawyers the most important questions facing their families and trust lawyers with bet-the-company questions. But lawyers answer these questions, for the most part, based on limited experience (at best) or hunches (at worst). Businesses analyze data for every part of their business, from marketing and supply chain to personnel and sales - every part except law. As clients seek to make more data-driven decisions, what obligation do law firms have to collect and refine data about opposing parties, judges, outcomes, and costs?   Are we preparing another generation of law students to duck these questions, or answer them with hunches?   Fastcase CEO Ed Walters will examine the frontiers of AI and data analytics, as well as the obligations of lawyers under the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility to employ and supervise artificial intelligence and data analytics tools at the frontiers of legal tech.

Speakers
avatar for Ed Walters

Ed Walters

CEO, Fastcase


Friday June 8, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
NT01

10:00am

Break 4
Break 4 6/8/18 10:00 - 10:30

Friday June 8, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
American University Washington College of Law 4300 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA

10:30am

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bot
As a law librarian, I find emerging technologies to be a source of both inspiration and concern. While I love learning about new technologies and reflecting upon how I can incorporate them into my instruction and reference work, I also can't help but consider how they will subsume some of my traditional functions and force me to adapt.  In response to this concern, while simultaneously experiencing some lingering burnout toward teaching, I set out to learn a new skill: how to build a law library chatbot.  In this session, I will discuss my attempt do so, including how I researched chatbot technology, my experience building a bot, and the insights I gained about its effectiveness in reaching library patrons.  Attendees will leave with an awareness of resources available for creating a chatbot, an understanding of how they work, and, hopefully, the inspiration to build a bot for their own libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Bowman

Jesse Bowman

Associate Law Librarian for Technology Initiatives and Instruction, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
Jesse Bowman is the Electronic Research, Technology, and Instructional Services Librarian at the Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. He teaches courses in legal research and legal technology and is always interested in incorporating new tools and technologies into his instructi... Read More →


Friday June 8, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
YT16

10:30am

How to Convert a Website to a Web App
At CALIcon12, Prof. Wiseman demonstrated how to convert a course website to a Chrome app. As of about the date of CALIcon18, Google is no longer supporting Chrome apps, having replaced them with Progressive Web Apps (PWAs). This session will explain why converting course websites to PWAs might make sense, and how to do it.

While this session should have some appeal to faculty who want to know why and how to convert their course websites into PWAs, it should also be of interest to IT folks wanting to help their faculty to do so (or who just have an interest in PWAs). Unlike Chrome apps, which were rather simple to create, PWAs, at least at their most sophisticated, are not. The essential elements of PWAs, the manifest and the service worker, will be briefly explained and their use to create an app demonstrated.

This presentation will be rather more technical than originally intended, PWAs being hard to grasp without going "under the hood".


Speakers
PW

Patrick Wiseman

Professor of Law, Georgia State University College of Law


Friday June 8, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
Y115

10:30am

IT Operations: Lessons Learned from the Field
This panel will focus on the most recent challenges facing law school IT professionals.    Discussions will include lessons learned and support strategies in the following areas:
  • Helpdesks/Field Services
  • Exam Period Support
  • Cloud Service Evaluations
  • Relationship Management and Communication
Panelists include:
  • Mark Beekhuizen, IT Director, SJ Quinney College of Law €“ University of Utah
  • Tony Forseythe, CEO, Appointlink
  • Corey Meingarten, System Administrator, Western Law, Ontario
  • Jonathan Sibray , IT Director, University of Colorado Law School
Moderator:   Corinne St. Claire, Director of Law School Technology Services, Loyola Law School Los Angeles

Speakers
avatar for Mark Beekhuizen

Mark Beekhuizen

IT Director, SJ Quinney College of Law
Mark Beekhuizen joined the S.J. Quinney College of Law as IT Director in 2008, leading the IT team during a period of expansion and reorganization as the college began to evolve through leveraging information technology solutions both local and cloud-based solutions. My love for... Read More →
avatar for Corinne St. Claire

Corinne St. Claire

Director of Law School Technology Services, Loyola Law School Los Angeles
Corinne St. Claire joined Loyola Law School Los Angeles in 2011 as Assistant Director of Instructional Design & Technology. In 2016, she transitioned to Director of Law School Technology Services. With close to 13 years of experience in higher education, she has facilitated and managed... Read More →
avatar for Tony Forsythe

Tony Forsythe

CEO, AppointLink
Tony Forsythe is the founder and CEO of AppointLink Portal Solutions and has been providing IT services to the law school market since 2002. He has worked with 50+ institutions to create solutions for learning management, communications, seating charts, attendance, testing, grade... Read More →
CM

Corey Meingarten

Systems Administrator, Faculty of Law, Western University (Ontario, Canada)
avatar for Jonathan Sibray

Jonathan Sibray

IT Director, University of Colorado Law School
Jonathan Sibray is a Senior Director for IT at the University of Colorado Law School. He earned his BBA in MIS in 2002 and his MBA in Information Assurance in 2011. Jon’s career has focused on information technology in higher education since 1998. His accomplishments include: implementing... Read More →


Friday June 8, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
Y116

11:30am

Lunch 2
Lunch 2 6/8/18

Friday June 8, 2018 11:30am - 1:00pm
Grossman Hall

12:00pm

Library Tour
Friday June 8, 2018 12:00pm - 12:45pm
Law Library 2nd Floor

12:00pm

Tech Tour
The tech will start at the Technology office, NT10 (Terrace level of the Warren building), then visit a large classroom, seminar room, the library active learning lab, and our court room, with one or two other rooms depending on time.

Speakers
RC

Russell Confroy

American University Washington College of Law
BR

Bryan Rapp

Director of Technology, American University Washington College of Law


Friday June 8, 2018 12:00pm - 12:45pm
NT10

1:00pm

Law School Transparency
Kyle McEntee, executive director of Law School Transparency, will provide an overview of LST's Data Dashboard, including data/analysis about law school costs, enrollment, job outcomes, and more. LST created this tool to make it easier for legal education stakeholders, policymakers, journalists, and the public to understand the current state of legal education. It will, hopefully, lead to new insights that advance legal education. After all, the foundation of reform continues to be good ideas supported by data.
This session does not require prior knowledge.

Speakers

Friday June 8, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
YT16

1:00pm

Dealing with established systems, legacy systems, and technical debt in law school IT shops
This is an issue that I don't think has ever been fully discussed at CALIcon: how do small development operations like law schools deal with things like the endless upgrade cycle, technical debt, end of life situations and more. This is certainly something we struggle with all the time at CALI where we have a constant tension between building new things and maintaining an increasing number of stable projects.
I'll be assembling a panel to help out with this.

Speakers
avatar for John Joergensen

John Joergensen

Senior Associate Dean for Information Services, Rutgers Law School
avatar for Elmer Masters

Elmer Masters

Director of Technology, CALI
Elmer R. Masters is the Director of Technology at the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (www.cali.org) where he works on interesting projects involving technology and legal education like eLangdell, Classcaster, Lawbooks, and the CALI website. He has over 20 years experience... Read More →


Friday June 8, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
NT07

1:00pm

Real World Video Accessibility
Video accessibility is a hot topic in higher education these days with several universities facing lawsuits related to their practices in this area.   This session will discuss what's required under the law, what some universities have chosen to do in response to lawsuits, and provide practical tips on best practices and methods for making videos accessible at differening budget levels.
  • Attendees should have a basic understanding of what accessibility is, and an interest in video accessibility topics like closed captioning.
  • This session will cover the different types of video captioning available, include live vs. on-demand, and human vs. computer generated captions.
  • Some of the technology platforms to be discussed will include YouTube, Facebook Live, GoToWebinar, Skype and Mediasite.
  • We'll include a live demo of live captioning of the session room permitting.
 

Speakers
BR

Bryan Rapp

Director of Technology, American University Washington College of Law


Friday June 8, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Y116

1:00pm

Teaching Tech to Law Students
For the last three years - I have taught a class called Technology and the Practice of Law.   My class includes hardware/software, security, social media/marketing, apps, and more.
This session would be for anyone that wants to do this, has done it, or wants to something different.
I would go over what all I cover in my class, what I have learned, what I have changed, and what I would like to do in the future with this class and/or other possible classes.
I have found that students may know some tech - but they may are not as prepared as they need to be when it comes to tech for clerking, interviews, and working.
 

Speakers
avatar for Grace Simms

Grace Simms

IT Librarian, Beeson Law Library


Friday June 8, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Y115

2:00pm

Break 5
Break 5 6/8/18 2:00 - 2:30

Friday June 8, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
American University Washington College of Law 4300 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA

2:30pm

Distance Learning in Non-Distance Learning Courses
The ABA allows law schools to use distance learning in any course as long as it doesn't replace more than 1/3 of in-class time.   This should make it easy for faculty to explore the use of distance learning technologies in their existing courses.   Also, some distance learning tech overlaps nicely with in-class interactions.   Asynchronous formative assessment, online office hours, CALI lessons, online peer-review projects are all examples of using DL tech in non-DL courses.    
Three presenters will discuss experiences of teaching or working with faculty who have used DL tech in non-DL courses.   Even if you are not attending this session, the speakers encourage you to send a short blurb about your experience.    

Speakers
avatar for John Mayer

John Mayer

Executive Director, CALI
Executive Director of CALI - law school consortium. Developers of A2J Author and hosts of A2J.org. Not a lawyer, 30 years working in tech, legal education and access to justice.


Friday June 8, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Y400

2:30pm

60 TIPS IN 60 MINUTES FOR LAW SCHOOL TECHIES - THE CALI EDITION
Back by popular demand from the 2017 MAALL conference in Milwaukee!  

We'll showcase 60 of our favorite tech tools, tips, apps, websites, cheats, and more.  These tips will benefit anyone looking for new ways to teach research, teach tech concepts, use technology, and improve efficiency (with a couple thrown in just for fun).
  • Takeaway #1: Identify 60 useful tech tools and tips for law school technologists of all kinds
  • Takeaway #2: Explore the pros and cons of these tips

Speakers
avatar for Emily Barney

Emily Barney

Technology Training & Marketing Librarian, Chicago-Kent College of Law
I manage WordPress sites for our faculty, staff departments and student organizations. I offer training sessions on Google Apps, Microsoft Office, and whatever other tips people are interested in. I'm part of a team handling social media marketing for the law school. I try to find... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Ginsberg

Deborah Ginsberg

Educational Technology Librarian, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law Library
Debbie Ginsberg joined Chicago-Kent in 2002 as the Electronic Resources Librarian. She has served as the law school’s Educational Technology Librarian since 2009, assisting faculty students, and staff with using technology for teaching, work, and scholarship. She served as chair... Read More →


Friday June 8, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Y402

2:30pm

Bridging the Gap on Legal Tech Proficiency at Law Schools
More and more law students are pursuing interests in legal technology, but many are witnessing a gap at their respective schools. This gap is usually not primarily about budgets, or procuring the latest and greatest software, but instead revolves around issues such as institutional buy-in, communication to the student body and the wider community, and cooperation between departments. All these competencies are required to foster the growth of legal technology courses and work experience at an institution. This session is a panel discussion in which the panelists will discuss their unique experiences engaging with legal technology at their law schools, the gaps they encountered, and how they reconciled those gaps with their professional development goals.   Panelists are all recent graduates and NextGen Fellows at the ABA Center for Innovation.
Attendees do not need to have any technical knowledge, only a desire to learn more about recent law graduates' experiences with legal technology in the classroom. Through the experiences of the panelists, this session will introduce concrete steps that law schools can take to build out new or improve existing legal technology programs. Therefore, attendees who are interested in developing legal technology programs at their law schools are highly encouraged.
Moderator:
Michael Robak, Director of the Schoenecker Law Library, Associate Dean and Clinical Professor of Law, University of St. Thomas
Panelists:
Amanda Brown, '16 Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
Athena Fan, '17 American University Washington College of Law
Tobias Franklin, '17 University of Maine School of Law
Irene Mo, '17 Michigan State University College of Law

Speakers
AB

Amanda Brown

NextGen Fellow, ABA Center for Innovation
avatar for Athena Fan

Athena Fan

NextGen Fellow, ABA Center for Innovation
avatar for Tobias Franklin

Tobias Franklin

NextGen Fellow, ABA Center for Innovation
Tobias is a 2017-2018 NextGen Fellow at the ABA Center for Innovation. His project is to build Fair Screening, a tool that will empower low and moderate-income Illinois renters applying for new housing. Fair Screening will help renters request free copies of their tenant screening... Read More →
avatar for Irene Mo

Irene Mo

NextGen Fellow, ABA Center for Innovation
Irene is an inagural NextGen Fellow at the American Bar Association Center for Innovation. Her fellowship project is focused on helping low-income and marginalized individuals understand privacy and data security risks by explaining the legal ramifications of identity theft, data... Read More →
MR

Michael Robak

University of St. Thomas School of Law


Friday June 8, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Y401

2:30pm

H2O 2.0: A New Way to Create and Share Legal Ed Texts
Casebooks  are expensive, inflexible, proprietary and mostly unavailable in digital form. This is bad for law faculty and their students. Given the capabilities of the web and the public domain nature of most of the materials in casebooks, faculty and students should have a way to create, adapt, view and print on-demand digital caseboks in their browsers.
H2O offers a platform for making and sharing open-licensed casebooks and other course materials online, by allowing professors to freely develop, remix, and share online textbooks under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License. H2O is based on the open-source model: instead of locking down materials in formalized textbooks, we believe that course books can be free (as in €œfree speech €) for everyone to access and, just as important, build upon. Currently, H2O is geared primarily toward law professors, though the platform can be used across intellectual domains.
In this, presenter Brett Johnson from the Harvard Law School's Library Innovation Lab will discuss the newest, just-released iteration of H2O and how it reflects things learned from the first iteration, the lab's real-life experiences with sharing/remixing in the legal education arena, and producing texts that are direct-to-student + print-on-demand, as well as how the lab has navigated questions of copyright on an open-course platform along with discussing future directions for H2O.

Speakers
avatar for Brett Johnson

Brett Johnson

Outreach/Support Lead, Library Innovation Lab, Harvard Law School
OER + Open casebooksweb archiving + citation preservationcomedy


Friday June 8, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Y403

3:30pm

Break 6
Break 6 6/8/18 3:30 - 4:00

Friday June 8, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
American University Washington College of Law 4300 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA

4:00pm

Law student technology competency - how do we pay for it?
Most of us agree that the majority of law students need some level of technology education in order to in order to be competent to practice law under Rule 1.1 of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct. As of February 2018, 28 states have adopted an explicit duty of technology competency and other states have indicated that their broader competency rule would encompass technology competency.
We can debate whose responsibility it is to provide technology education but, for purposes of this discussion, we'll talk about those situations that the law school takes on some responsibility for it and how that is funded. If these are teaching and learning resources are they purchased by the library? What about the IT or law school budget? In this time of shrinking or flat budgets, where  do we find the money and what are we giving up instead? Hear from a panel of of your colleagues how different models are working at their institutions and join a discussion about possible ways  to prioritize and fund legal technology education and the pros and cons of each.
Level of knowledge: This session is suitable for all attendees, novice to expert.
Takeaways:  Attendees will leave the session with (a) an understanding of different options for where  legal technology education may find a home in the law school, (b) the pros and cons of each model, and (c) budgetary impacts of the various models.
Interested in joining the panel? Looking for IT, library,  faculty, and law school administration perspectives to share. 

Speakers
avatar for Darin Fox

Darin Fox

Associate Dean, University of Oklahoma Law Library
Darin Fox is Associate Dean and Director of the Law Library at the University of Oklahoma College since 2005. He previously served as Associate Dean, Director of Information Technology, and Computer Services Librarian at the University of Southern California Law School from 1994-2004... Read More →
avatar for Kris Niedringhaus

Kris Niedringhaus

Assoc Dean for Library & Info Services, Georgia State University College of Law
Kris Niedringhaus is Associate Dean for Library and Information Services at Georgia State University College of Law. Kris has been a library director for 12+ years and supervised law school IT for 8 of those years. She speaks and writes about management issues, legal research and... Read More →
MR

Michael Robak

University of St. Thomas School of Law
avatar for Roger Skalbeck

Roger Skalbeck

Professor of Law, Richmond School of Law
Roger V. Skalbeck is a Professor of Law and the Associate Dean for Library and Information Services at the University of Richmond School of Law. He likes access to justice, technology, sushi, palindromes, and Euro board games.
avatar for Carol Watson

Carol Watson

Law Librarian, University of Georgia
Carol A. Watson has served as director of the UGA Law Library since 2010. She is responsible for the vision, leadership and management of all aspects of the law library including strategic planning, budgeting, collection development, technology and personnel. She has written extensively... Read More →


Friday June 8, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Y401

4:00pm

Teaching a Synchronous Online Class using WebEx.
This program will discuss using WebEx to teach synchronous online courses.

This program will examine:
  • Complying with ABA Standards
  • Discussion of best practices for course and classroom management
  • Discussion of the technology used to create, host, and share the course materials. 
The following potential presenters have hands on experience with teaching online synchronous course projects and include:
  • Jeff Chilcott, Instructional Technologist and AV Coordinator at Elon University School of Law, assists in media management and creation. He holds a B.A. in Film Production from the University of North Carolina Wilmington.
  • Abigail Deese, Evening and Weekend Reference Librarian at Elon University School of Law, teaches basic and advanced legal research at Elon. She holds a B.A. in Classics from the College of Charleston, a J.D. from the Charleston School of Law and a M.L.I.S. from the University of Arizona.
  • Kathleen McLeod, Associate Dean for Library and Information Systems at Elon University School of Law, teaches basic and advanced legal reserch courses at Elon. She holds an A.B. from Syracuse University, a J.D. from Washington University in St. Louis and a M.L.S. from Southern Connecticut State University.
  • Charles Perkins, Reference/Access Services Librarian at Elon University School of Law, teaches basic legal research at Elon. He holds a B.S. from the United States Naval Academy, a M.S.L.I.S. from the Catholic University of America, and a J.D. from Seton Hall University School of Law.


Speakers
AD

Abigail Deese

Reference Librarian, Elon University School of Law
KM

Kathleen McLeod

Associate Dean for Library and Information Services, Elon University School of Law
CP

Charles Perkins

Access Services Librarian, Elon


Friday June 8, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Y400

4:00pm

Using Guided Interviews to Serve Non-Profits
This session will describe a class project, incorporated in a course entitled "The Law of Social Entrepreneurship and Exempt Organizations," in which students utilized A2J Author to prepare two guided interviews.   Thse guided interviews will allow end-users who may want to create a non-profit under New York Law to prepare a certificate of incorporation and by-laws for the organization in accordance with NY state law.   While the students learned the substantive law of non-profits through the course, they also learned business process analysis and A2J Author programming to develop these two guided interviews. We are in the beta-testing phase through which students are presenting the interviews to community members and practicing lawyers to get their guidance and feedback before we formally launch the two interviews and make them public, which we expect to happen by the end of June 2018.   This work was done with the guidance and assistance of Jessica Frank and John Mayer from CALI.   Presenters will include Ray Brescia, professor of law, Albany Law School, who led the course; Alexandria Decatur and Julia Kosinski, two students who participated in the project and class; and Jessica Frank and John Mayer of CALI.
The goal of the presentation will be to show the methodology by which we developed and tested the A2J Author for use in this context, but also how using A2J Author dovetails nicely with substantive/doctrinal law courses.    

Speakers
avatar for Raymond Brescia

Raymond Brescia

Professor of Law, Albany Law School


Friday June 8, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Y403

4:00pm

All the Cool Things CALI is ... and Could Be Doing
CALI has a LOT of projects.   I will talk about these cursorily, but the bulk of this session will be talking about CALI and the future of edlegaltech.   What *should* CALI be doing to deliver the most benefit to our law school members?   How can we be better leaders?    

Speakers
avatar for John Mayer

John Mayer

Executive Director, CALI
Executive Director of CALI - law school consortium. Developers of A2J Author and hosts of A2J.org. Not a lawyer, 30 years working in tech, legal education and access to justice.


Friday June 8, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Y402

5:00pm

Closing Plenary
Speakers
avatar for John Mayer

John Mayer

Executive Director, CALI
Executive Director of CALI - law school consortium. Developers of A2J Author and hosts of A2J.org. Not a lawyer, 30 years working in tech, legal education and access to justice.


Friday June 8, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Grossman Hall